Hi, you are logged in as , if you are not , please click here
You are shopping as , if this is not your email, please click here

Distinguished Lectures

Join us for our next Distinguished Lecture organised by the School of Social Sciences. This is open to colleagues across the university, so please sign up if you would like to attend.

Distinguished Lectures

Sara Ryan (Manchester Met): 26th April 2023

Lives and Afterlives: Economic Change and the Everyday 6th March

FREE OF CHARGE

Description

Wednesday 6th March, 3:30-5:30pm in Eden109 (Light refreshments will be available at 3pm on Eden first floor mezzanine)
Professor Sarah Marie Hall (University of Manchester)

Lives and Afterlives: Economic Change and the Everyday
Abstract: With this talk I share ideas from my forthcoming book about the lives and afterlives of economic change. Economic change, such as austerity, Brexit and Devolution, I argue, are living: economic change is lived and experienced, and has its own life. And these are intermingled and messy, a multitude of things, people, places and times. I focus here on one chapter of the book, concerning materials as living and lively, and especially on ‘making material’, using the example of making a community podcast on Brexit. I shed light on multi-material entanglements in how things are made with others. I also discuss the ‘life’ of the podcast as an intangible material, which can have a livingness and liveliness within everyday memories, stories and futures.
Read More
Sara Ryan (Manchester Met): 26th April 2023

Towards socially inclusive environmental policy: concepts, insights and challenges 25th April

FREE OF CHARGE

Description

Wednesday 24th April, 3-5pm in Eden 109 (Light refreshments will be available at 3pm on Eden first floor mezzanine)
Professor Lucie Middlemiss (University of Leeds)

The transition to Net Zero marks a radical reshaping of many aspects of everyday life. It also has the potential to influence positively a number of social challenges: improving public health, reducing the effects of poverty, increasing wellbeing, and bringing communities together. However, these positive outcomes are by no means a given. Household on low incomes in particular are less resilient than ever following austerity, covid 19 and the cost of living crisis, and the magnitude of change envisaged here risks being overwhelming.

In this talk I will combine conceptual work on social inclusion in Net Zero, and empirical insights from research in seven low-income communities in Leeds and Newcastle, where we ran a series of workshops to understand their perspectives and concerns on this issue. We found that people’s ability to participate in net zero was shaped by the particular community they live in (due to its geographical location, local services and infrastructure), by their house (the building and its tenure) and home (the people they live with) as well as by their lack of funds. It is clear from our data that people are already acting on net zero, taking small measures that help them save money, with the support of family, community and employers. However people have big concerns about their ability to participate in the more substantial changes they can see ahead.

I finish by reflecting on policy in this field, and suggesting some more productive, and socially inclusive, directions.
Read More

How would you rate your experience today?

How can we contact you?

What could we do better?

   Change Code